Archive for the ‘books/zines’ Category.

Yet more praise for Turbulent Times issue 10

More lovely people saying nice things about my latest.

You can order your copy here.

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REVIEW BY IDWAL FISHER:

At least we didn’t have to wait for fifteen years for another issue of the excellent Turbulent Times to appear. That was fifteen years between issues eight and nine in which editor John Eden decided to spend more time with his cabbage patch than with keyboard and pen. The wait is now down to a year which suits me fine.

I heaped praise on issue nine and I heap praise on issue ten. The reason I heap praise is because John Eden has the jaundiced eye that every zine writer needs. Not for him the enthusiastic yap of a wide-eyed teenager whose just been to his first noise gig and is now busy scanning eBay for cheap guitar pedals. Eden even reviews records he cant find anymore. This is more like it. Seat of your pants zine writing with plenty of the self and none of the psuedo wankery, dodgy font shit that ruins many a publication. It almost makes me wish I still did a zine. Well, almost.

In issue ten you get two enlightening interviews with Simon Morris of the Ceramic Hobs who despite being forever associated with mental imbalance always comes across as the most sensible person you’ve ever met. In the eight page accompanying booklet he holds forth on fascism/anti fascism in music and in the main zine on The Hobs. Both are worth your time.

There’s further interviews with now ex noise artist Elizabeth Veldon which highlights just how Neanderthal some noise fans/artists can be when faced with someone who has a brain and Pete Um who just can’t seem to make his mind up. Concrete/Field and Jah Excretion bring in the rest of the field and lets not forget the impossible to be dull artist Dr. Steg who gets an outing in a piece written by Pete Coward.

Its in the review section where Eden shines brightest though. His pieces on The Extreme Rituals Festival may be two years after the event but who’s complaining? As far as I’m concerned I was glad of the reminiscences and being enlightened as to the bits I missed. Trevor Wishart, The Residents and events at Bexhill Pavilion involving experimental electronic artists of a European bent also get a mention. Best record review goes to a spelling mistake of a band called müllGRMM TÜTEsk whose record he cant find. Its the kind of personal touch you just cant find in mainstream publications. The Wire should give him a job pronto but I dare say he’d tell them where to shove it.

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REVIEW BY MY OLD MUCKER LAWRENCE BURTON:

This one falls some way outside of the usual parameters in context of the sort of thing I tend to review but fuck it – John Eden is one of those people who has always managed to make the world in his immediate vicinity a much more interesting place to be, and one of the few people I’ve known for any length of time who is yet to inspire me to any clandestine two-faced mutterings on the topic of perceived twattery during paranoid or otherwise less charitable interludes. His work deserves support is what I am trying to say, and so here we are.

To briefly fly off in another direction entirely, Philip Purser-Hallard’s Of the City of the Saved… describes a technological afterlife amounting to the Christian heaven wherein everyone who has ever lived mingles with everyone else who has ever lived. Oddly, I feel I’m beginning to get some idea of how this might feel, because nothing ever goes away forever, at least not any more. I read earlier editions of Turbulent Times back in the nineties. I am now facebook friends with others I knew at the same time, some of whom will also recall both this magazine and some of the artists featured. Weirdest of all – at least to me – was finding myself recommending this to Simon who used to work in Discovery Records in Stratford-on-Avon when I was at school over thirty years ago, and who sold me my copy of Never Mind the Bollocks. It’s not like we were best mates or anything, but he turned up as a friend of a friend on facebook, and we began talking, and it turned out that he’s still a big fan of both vinyl records and printed fanzines thirty plus years down the line. He’d just bought the new album by Philip Best’s Consumer Electronics, just as I come across references to the same Philip Best in my 1983 diary which I’m presently transcribing to electronic form; and then a different Simon, specifically one of the Ceramic Hobs, informs me of the astonishing fact that Philip Best is moving to Austin, which is quite near where I now live, and that he has been following my blog, An Englishman in Texas. Anyway, Simon – the one who once sold me Never Mind the Bollocks – dutifully sent away for Turbulent Times and enjoyed it just as I hoped he would; and of course he did because he’s a man of taste and it’s a blummin’ good read.

Anyway, the point of this is that sometimes I’m no longer quite sure there’s still such a thing as the past. Recent eras have developed into a permanent present, and there’s something really satisfying about finding a fanzine made of ink, paper, and staples in my mailbox in 2014. Since the advent of the internet and any old wanker being able to share their inconsequential thoughts with an indifferent universe by means costing no pennies, the sort of commitment required to achieve printed form has come to mean a great deal more than was once the case; and Turbulent Times is accordingly one hell of a lot more fun than reading something off a screen.

This issue covers a ton of people – musicians, noise artists, and general oddballs – about whom I previously knew nothing, and whose work I may not even like should I ever hear it, but who nevertheless provide the foundations of fascinating and witty reading. There’s also the endlessly entertaining Ceramic Hobs interviewed, and a pleasantly unequivocal discussion of fascist tendencies in weirdy music, and Elizabeth Veldon countering the sausagery of the noise scene. Figurative breaths of fresh air occur with some frequency.

It’s very strange being nearly fifty years old and reading this magazine in Texas, but it has reminded me how exciting it can be to discover this sort of stuff and specifically in this way. It’s great to know that this exists and that it definitively exists right now, as opposed to representing another virtual recycling endlessly reproduced on a thousand screens for a few moments before the passive and not really too bothered consumer clicks onto something else. Turbulent Times is nothing less than inspirational.

Praise for Turbulent Times issue 10!

The zine is going down well with the people I hoped it would. Thanks to everyone who ordered a copy so far and especially those of you who took the time to get back to me with your thoughts. Some of these are collected below.

Issue 10 is still available from me here. But please note that there are only two copies is only one copy of issue 9 left at the time of writing.

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Photo by Craig

“I have read approx 67.4% of Turbulent Times 10 and already it rates AAA on the fanzinometer. Essential”
– Rob Hayler, Radio Midwich

“particularly enjoyed reviews of other noise fanzines”
– Neil Campbell, Astral Social Club

“Even the bag Turbulent Times 10 comes in is top quality.”
– John Appleby

“You absolutely definitely need a copy if yr into odd music & art, superb stuff…”
– Phil Sniff

“Kept new issue of Turbulent Times for this bus journey & it’s a scorcher... [john] is a fantastically funny live reviewer”
– Loki, IX Tab.

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Photo by GRMMSK

“BEST NOISEZINE EVER: Issue #10 of Turbulent Times is the best issue yet of one of the best mags ever. Crammed to b-b-b-bursting point w/ info and reviews and features on some of our favourite artists – both ‘Noise’ and Non-Noise – incl: our pal, the talented and all-round lovely geeeezer Pete UM (Bumskipper 3 is very good, btw; actually, all Pete’s stuff is worth a listen, but you should def. burrow into his vinyl.back.cat), super-prolific musician Elizabeth Veldon meditating on ‘beauty’ and dealing w/ online abuse from peabrained fascisti-powerelectronics idiots and – well, I would be slacking in my non-job if I didn’t hep you crazy stactivist thrill-seekers to the Super-Now sound of CONCRETE / FIELD.

Yes, I espesh like that the mag is vehemently anti-fascist and ain’t afraid to say it out loud. But that don’t mean it’s all po-faced and ain’t no fun. Oh, no. That repurposed Jack Chick toon made me howl so hard I soiled my britches.

I was also VERY happy that the package included a Degenerate Waves badge. There was something oddly thrilling about finding that minimal black-type-on-a-yellow-background disk in amongst the zine debris. Couldn’t say why, exactly, though.

Subsubunderground rumours that John Eden – he of legendary BCM-box-numbering – is travelling back in time so that he can release #11 before #10 came out, and that it’ll be in the form of a 48-page A1 Wordsearch, can neither be confirmed knor denied at this point.

Keep reading John’s blog or twitter for details; it’ll arrive VERY soon in your diemenschun, I’m sure.

Cannot recommend this mag highly enough. TT10 and a bottle of 64% Slovakian spirit will get me through this autumn, I tell ya.”Kek-W, Kid Shirt

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Photo by Frozen Reeds

“The final weekend in October and I was asked to DJ at a gig festering Consumer Electronics, Sudden Infant, Mark Wynn and Sleaford Mods at The 100 Club in London. Quite an honour … it also gave me the chance of meeting up with my eldest (Huw) who I hadn’t seen in about six years …

It was at the gig I was handed a copy of ‘Turbulent Times #10′ by writer in chief John Eden. A hand with a beaming face shortly behind it came out of the 100 Club darkness and gave me a copy, then retreated back towards the “happening” throng. The magazine became a godsend for the long train journey back the next day.

‘Turbulent Times’ is not an irreverent read but at the same time it is not “The Wire”. #10 centres around the words and works of Simon Morris and Theeeeee Ceramic Hobs, a great interview about the production of the “Spirit World Circle Jerk” album and a supplement tract where Simon explains his feelings towards fascism / anti-fascism in subterranean culture (always interested in this subject as i have been labelled a fascist by a few because of my association with Tesco Org), as well as an attempted interview with a man who walks the streets of Stamford Hill with a swastika sandwich board strapped to his torso – I have seen this man walking the streets myself whenever I have stayed in Stamford Hill … on the way to Stoke Newington but never had the balls to engage with him…

The rest of the magazine made the journey fly by with an insight to the works of Peter Um (who I took a great dislike to when I saw him live in a field in Cambridgeshire four years ago) and Adolf Steg. Two Steg postcards are inside …. There are reviews of live events such as the Extreme Rituals Event that took place in 2012 and words on releases by Re:Clip, Small Cruel Party and Ekoplekz amongst others … a great and easy read that makes the unknown and unheard worth investigating.”
Steve, Muh Mur

 

Turbulent Times issue 10 now out!


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Photo by Nick Ekoplekz

Photo by Nick Ekoplekz

60 page fanzine! In a bag!

With:

8 page insert on anti-fascism and music!

2 full-colour Adolf Steg postcards!

Degenerate Waves Badge!

(Apologies for ridiculous overseas prices – these are because of the recently privatised UK Post Office).

Also available from Electric Knife (London) and Praxis (Berlin) – both of which are physical shops that also do mailorder.

Enquiries from other distributors and people wanting to blag free copies are welcome.

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ORDER ISSUES 9 AND 10 FOR JUST A QUID MORE:

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There are still some copies the last issue left. See this page for enthusiastic reviews.

Buying both is only one pound more, because the postage cost is the same:

Nomex interview for Datacide

Nomex Cassette Cover 2011

Introduction to the piece:

Nomex should need no introduction to Datacide readers, but here goes anyway. One of the organisers of the seminal “Dead by Dawn” parties held in the mid nineties at Brixton’s 121 Centre, Nomex contributed visuals, abstract/harsh performances and much more besides.

His releases on his own Adverse label have included everything from vinyl abuse to the sounds of bones in the Paris catacombs. The Nomex discography also includes output on Praxis, Cavage, and Reverse amongst others. Despite performing across the globe (from Teknivals to art galleries) he is still a purposely-obscure figure to most. What follows is the only print interview I am aware of.

http://datacide.c8.com/emencified-shrill-out-nomex-at-the-controls/

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Datacide issue 13 now available

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The London launch party was a lot of fun, with some great presentations and people.

The magazine is out now. It includes a great interview I did with noise legend Nomex.

Order from here or from the Praxis Shop.

76 pages.

Datacide: Introduction
Nemeton: Infiltration and Agent Provocateurs; Vision Tech; Endless War; Surveillance, Control and Repression
CF: NSU Update
Two in London: UK Anti-Fascist Round Up
Comrade Omega: Crisis in the SWP, or: Weiningerism in the UK
David Cecil: Confessions of an Accidental Activist
Neil Transpontine: Spiral Tribe Interview with Mark Harrison
Neil Transpontine: ‘Revolt of the Ravers’-The Movement Against the Criminal Justice Act in Britain, 1993-95
Split Horizon: What is This Future?
Fabian Tompsett: Wikipedia-A Vernacular Encyclopedia
Howard Slater: Shared Vertigo
Dan Hekate: Crystal Distortion
Howard Slater: Cut-Up Marx
Howard Slater: EARTH ‘A RUN RED
Marcel Stoetzler: Identity, Commodity and Authority: Two New Books about Horkheimer and Adorno
Nemeton: Life During Wartime: Resisting Counterinsurgency (book review)
Christoph Fringeli: One Night in Stammheim. Helge Lehmann: Die Todesnacht von Stammheim – Eine Untersuchung (book review)
Christoph Fringeli: Anton Shekovtsov, Paul Jackson (eds.): White Power Music – Scenes of the Extreme Right Cultural Resistence (book review)
CF: Press reviews
John Eden: Emencified Shrill Out: Nomex at the Controls
Alexis Wolton: Vinyl Meltdown, Prt. 1
Record reviews by Zombieflesheater, Nemeton and Kovert
DJ Charts
Matthieu Bourel: Rioter
Sansculotte: Overdosed
Plus: The Lives and Times of Bloor Schleppy

 

EVENT: SUN 20th October: Datacide 13 launch party

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Datacide zine London launch event

The 13th issue of Datacide, the international magazine for noise and politics, is out this week. As well as a conference and release party in Berlin this weekend, there will be a launch event on Sunday 20th October 2013 in London, 7 pm to 10 pm.

The event will take place at Vinyl (4 Tanners Hill, SE8 4PJ) the new record shop/cafe/gallery in Deptford.

It will feature talks from Datacide contributors, including Neil Transpontine looking back on the movement against the ‘anti-rave’ Criminal Justice Act, and Christoph Fringeli on Datacide magazine. Further details to be announced.

Sunday nights sounds courtesy of DJ Controlled Weirdness, and there will be a bar.

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(I have an article in the magazine and will probably get some copies to sell/trade/blag. It will also be available at the London Anarchist Bookfair the previous day. But come to the launch event if you can, it will be good).

February updates

1. SPATIAL INTERVIEWED BY JOHN EDEN

An interview I did with Hackney-based producer Spatial is now published exclusively and for the first time at The Liminal.

This piece was originally intended for issue 5 of Woofah, but has been fully updated. (It’s the last outstanding thing I wrote for Woofah, which makes me a bit smiley and a bit weepy!). Spatial is an interesting guy and is well worth checking.

2. MORE TURBULENT TIMES ACTION

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Idwal Fisher did a lovely review of my Turbulent Times fanzine, along with other publications.

The zine now has its own page if people are interested in ordering it or knowing about distributors etc.

I have properly started work on the new issue but can’t say when it will be out!

3. AND FINALLY, SOME ADVERTS:

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3rd Official Trailer for A Noisy Delivery, by Pete Cann from GX Jupitter-Larsen on Vimeo.

End of 2012 updates

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Turbulent Times #9 is selling steadily and is now also available from these recommended stockists:

Norman Records

Turgid Animal

I know that the cost of overseas postage is putting some people off, so you might want to order a couple of things along with your zine and reduce the p&p charges that way.

Norman Records is good for the Libbe Matz Gang/Xylitol split, Pete UM and IX Tab. Turgid Animal stocks all kinds of noisy dark shit that it’s worth taking a punt on if that is your thing.

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The interview I did with Jordi Valls of Vagina Dentata Organ is now online at the Datacide site along with other great articles from the new issue.

I have updated my VDO fan site with a collection of material concerning the recent amazing performance as part of the Extreme Rituals festival in Bristol.

My own review of the event will appear in Turbulent Times #10, to be published at some point in 2013…

I am very bored of “best of 2012″ lists and will not be doing one. Check my reviews in Turbulent Times or Datacide and scroll back through posts on here if you want to know what I rated!

Happy new year to you all.

 

The world clutches new issue of Turbulent Times to its heart!

“You’ve done a 48-page fanzine about noise? WHY?” – Paul Meme, Grievous Angel

“Been devouring it this weekend. Awesome zine.” – Ekoplekz

“My fonts logo catches my focus just about every time I see it. That a person is superb. Quite great publish!” - A Spambot

“The ‘zine is essential reading. It has a kind of Idwal Fisher attitude and a ‘toilet reading’ air. Not irreverent and not snooty – ‘I know more than you do’ – like some ‘zines I could name just a damn good read. Easy, informative and not that serious as ‘Eraciator’s History Of Harsh Noise’ proves. That piece made me laugh.

There’s a recent interview with Nigel Ayers and Libbe Matz Gang…I’ve seen their name pop up a few times now in various ‘zines and internet boards, might be time to dip the toe so to speak. There’s a piece by Jupitter-Castrol GTX on revolutionary noise anthems and the obligatory record reviews .. also some live reviews, which is coming uncommon in the printed ‘zine….good to see. The cover did promise knitting, but I have scoured the ‘zine from cover to cover and there’s no mention of knitting! As a subscriber to The Knitter and Yarn Wise I was very disappointed. 

I am saving some of this fanzine to read on the train to Bristol this coming weekend… Turbulent Times is A5 sized (pocket porn) and about 50 pages… and like I said at the start… essential.

The back cover features an excellent picture of a guy trying to shove his shirt in his ears at a Rehberg & Schmickler gig at Cafe OTO. ” – Steve, MuhMur Blog.

“The Consumer Electronics live review is priceless.” – Jonathan, old-school veteran TT reader

“Deep investigations into dub noise hybrids, things on cassette, and so on. Highly recommended.” – Fade2

Wow… John Eden’s new fanzine is like a slip into the 80s… We need this kind of thing right now almost as much as we needed it then…” Loki, IX Tab

“Turbulent Times #9 is a seditionary act of genius. Definitely Hacker Farm’s Fanzine of the Year: a twisted labour of love.”
–  Kek-W, Hacker Farm

“Harsh Noise History get a metal salute from me for starters!” – Pete Um

“Best zine in yonks. Worth it for the hilarious ‘My Summer of Noise’ article alone.” – BTi Enquiries, Beyond The Implode

Turbulent Times issue 9  still available from here.

(Tweetah issue zero is now  SOLD OUT)

Turbulent Times fanzine – issue 9 published

Roll up! Roll up! Get yer scrappy xerox noise rag!

48 pages A5 (half-size). Mainly by me. Design is even less professional than Tweetah. Content is even more cynical.

Trades/Blags/Distro offers are welcome.

Nocturnal Emissions – Nigel Ayers talks about his recent “Spinal Correction Shred” cassette amongst other stuff.

GX Jupitter-Larsen – The Haters mainstay on revolutionary noise anthems, nihilism etc.

Adventures in Noise Dub – A voyage into the cassette underground. Can we believe the hype?

Libbe Matz Gang – The cult lo-fi electronics unit play hard to get.

GRMMSK – Alienated doom dub from the frozen wastes.

Harsh Noise History – Eraciator’s less than helpful genre guide.

My Summer of Noise – live reviews

Audio Reviews

UK: £2.50

Europe: £4.50

Rest of World: £5.00


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